Category

Travel

Category

We are now settled into a condo in Invermere to experience a month of actual winter before it disappears for another year, so it seems like a good time to recap what we’ve been up to so far in 2021. In light of current global events, international travel seemed uncertain and unwise but, with nothing forcing us to endure what has appeared to be a fairly brutal Sask winter, we decided that we could still responsibly spend our time getting to know the beautiful west coast of Canada. Not the people of the west coast, necessarily, as, outside of a couple brief outdoor connections with friends we know from Guatemala, we basically see no one. But we have been able to enjoy plenty of spectacular hikes, beaches and waterfalls, and are constantly thankful we have this kind of freedom, given the many complicated issues in the world at the moment.…

Durrance Lake is a local favourite, especially among families, fishermen and picnickers. Surrounded by scenic hills covered in impressive forest and lined with hiking trails, this cute little lake offers active pursuits as well as relaxation. Although still quite small in the scheme of Vancouver Island lakes, Durrance is actually the largest of the three lakes in Mount Work Regional Park and is deeper than it looks (16 metres at its deepest point, with a mean depth of 6 metres). Mount Work itself looms over the south side of the lake, while the Partridge Hills form a picturesque backdrop to the north. There is great fishing in Durrance Lake and it is common to see several small boats floating around on the placid waters. There is also a good variety of wildlife that are attracted to the lake, especially the swampy south side with its many fallen trees and deadwood…

Victoria is justifiably famous for several things – mild weather, beautiful harbour, historic architecture – but doesn’t get nearly enough credit for its amazing beaches. With the city occupying an entire peninsula in the southeastern corner of Vancouver Island, it has a lot of coastline, and that coastline has a lot of beaches. During the warm summer months these beaches get packed with families and sunbathers but they are well worth visiting all year-round for the scenery and atmosphere. Each one has its own unique personality and list of highlights so we made a list to help you narrow it down. Or you could just visit them all, I don’t know your schedule. In our opinion, these are the 7 best beaches close to downtown Victoria, each with their main claim to fame: Victoria Beaches Map Best Beaches in Victoria BC Gonzales Beach – Best Sheltered Beach This cute little…

The Kinsol Trestle, near Shawnigan Lake, BC, is one of the largest and most spectacular rail trestles in the world (and the very largest in all of the Commonwealth Nations, in case that is still something people pay attention to). Trestles are frames used to guide railway tracks over valleys and rivers and were usually made of timber. They are also often referred to as “trestle bridges”, although in most cases the bridge part is redundant (like Safeway grocery store or Florida Man does something stupid). This particular trestle is 187 metres long and stands 44 metres high, passing over the Koksilah River. It is one of 8 trestles on the Cowichan Valley Trail route but is by far the biggest and most impressive. Its 7-degree curve is unusual and represents an amazing feat of engineering, with the beams initially numbered and put together like a jigsaw puzzle. It is…

The wild frontier of southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia and, to a certain extent, Canada, Port Renfrew is located on the pretty little inlet of Port San Juan on the far west coast. With fabulous beaches, impressive mountains/hills and plenty of ancient rain forest and some of Canada’s biggest trees – Douglas firs, cedars and spruces, just to name a few – Port Renfrew is sometimes called the “Jewel of the West Coast”. It definitely earns the title “Tall Tree Capital of Canada”. You will definitely have a long list of things to do in Port Renfew during your stay. Of course, locals just call it “Renny”, all 144 of them, and even though it’s very small it is far enough from any other city to have everything it needs to sustain itself – school, general store, restaurants, hotels, library, post office, a pay phone (yes an actual working pay…

While it may not be quite as famous as its historic Middle Eastern namesake on the border between Israel and Jordan, Jordan River BC is still pretty well known locally as one of the top surfing destinations on Vancouver Island. Sure, maybe it can’t brag that it’s where Jesus had his head dunked by John the Baptist, but every day bold surfers dip themselves in the frigid Pacific waters in search of great waves. That has to count for something. Not to mention the closest this Jordan River (also commonly called the River Jordan) ever comes to being the front line of a devastating war is when the Vancouver surfing scene shows up and starts dropping in on the local waves. Of course, it isn’t just a surf spot, it is also a small logging town, is designated as a regional park and also has just the second hydroelectric plant…

Pin It