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Myanmar

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Since we know at least 4 people who should be arriving imminently, we decided to put together a detailed list of tips for Myanmar:   You can buy sim cards with data in the airport for less than $US 10 and considering how often the internet cut out on us during our time in Myanmar, having a 3G backup is well worth it.   The area just northwest of Shwedagon Paya in Yangon is chock-full of narrow lanes, chaotic street life and raucous beer stations. Don’t miss it. If you have time the Circular Train is worth checking out, if for no other reason than it costs less than a roll of bargain toilet paper.   The bike ride at Inle suggested in the Lonely Planet is actually pretty busy and a bit dangerous considering the size of the trucks and width of the road. But the views are still…

It says something when a country as historically isolated as Myanmar has a tourist attraction that is famous around the world. We had been looking forward to seeing Bagan’s thousands of incredible stupas scattered over miles of riverside plains for years and finally made it happen, hooking ourselves up with a peppy little electric moped (which we affectionately named Steve, although we rarely found it necessary to call it by name) to ensure ourselves unlimited freedom to wander among these ancient temples and monuments, including in the pre-dawn darkness, and often returning well after sunset as a wide variety of bugs smashed wildly into my face. However, at a location as visual as this one only Bagan photos will really do, hence…   This was our first afternoon in Bagan, still new to the feel of two of us on our “e-bike” and somehow managing to get ourselves onto what…

  “It will always be Burma to me.” – J. Peterman Sure, I stole the title, “Burmese Days”, from George Orwell, and from a book I haven’t even read no less. But I thought it sounded good. Anyway, Myanmar, which until 1990 was known as Burma in honour of its overwhelming majority of Burmese people, has long been one of the most controversial destinations for travellers to visit, or choose not to visit, or to visit and fill the coffers of the evil empire with their tourist dollars, or visit and do their damnedest to avoid government-owned business and “spread the money among the people”, and so on. The decision on whether or not it was ethical to travel in Myanmar was more greatly debated prior to 2011 when the country finally succumbed to international pressure and economic sanctions to introduce their version of a democratic government, or at least…

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